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Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)

The United States has developed as a global leader, in large part, through the genius and hard work of its scientists, engineers, and innovators. In a world that’s becoming increasingly complex, where success is driven not only by what you know, but by what you can do with what you know, it’s more important than ever for our youth to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to solve tough problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information. These are the types of skills that students learn by studying science, technology, engineering, and math—subjects collectively known as STEM.

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Women in STEM: 2017 Update

Fact sheets
In March, the Office of the Chief Economist (OCE) released the first in a series of reports updating and expanding our previous work examining the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce. That first report, "STEM Jobs: 2017 Update," provided an overview of STEM workers and their earning power. This second report provides a more detailed look at the gender dynamics of the STEM...

Cabinet Meeting Remarks on Workforce Training

Speeches
The President’s tax cuts and regulatory reform are creating a new wave of growth in our advanced manufacturing and technology industries, along with demand for thousands of skilled workers. Our strengthening economy is a godsend for many millions of Americans who want to be part of the workforce, and who now have the opportunity to participate productively in our economy. The lack of adequately...

Women in STEM: 2017 Update

Reports
In March, the Office of the Chief Economist (OCE) released the first in a series of reports updating and expanding our previous work examining the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce. That first report, "STEM Jobs: 2017 Update," provided an overview of STEM workers and their earning power. This second report provides a more detailed look at the gender dynamics of the STEM...

Inspiring Young Minds to be Innovators and Pursue their Dreams

Blog
In connection with American Dream Week (July 31 – August 4, 2017), the U.S. Department of Commerce is proud to highlight the important role Commerce agencies play in creating jobs and economic opportunities in American communities across the nation Blog by Joe Matal, Performing the Functions and Duties of the Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO At Camp...

STEM Jobs: 2017 Update

Reports
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers help drive our nation's innovation and competitiveness by generating new ideas and new companies. 1 For example, workers who study or are employed in these fields are more likely to apply for, receive, and commercialize patents. 2 STEM knowledge also has other benefits; while often very specialized, it can be transferred to a wide...

Spotlight on Commerce: Laurie Locascio, Acting Associate Director for Laboratory Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Blog
Ed. note: This post is part of the Spotlight on Commerce series highlighting the contributions of current and past members of the Department of Commerce during Women's History Month. Blog post by Laurie Locascio, Acting Associate Director for Laboratory Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Like a lot of scientists, I am very goal-oriented, so after I got my Ph.D. in...

Education Supports Racial and Ethnic Equality in STEM

Reports
Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workers are essential to American innovation and competitiveness in an increasingly dynamic and global marketplace. In this third report, we examine demographic disparities in STEM education and find that educational attainment may affect equality of opportunity in these critical, high-quality jobs of the future. This report follows an analysis of...

Women in STEM: A Gender Gap to Innovation

Reports
Our science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Yet women are vastly underrepresented in STEM jobs and among STEM degree holders despite making up nearly half of the U.S. workforce and half of the college-educated workforce. That leaves an untapped opportunity to expand STEM employment in the United States, even...

STEM: Good Jobs Now and For the Future

Reports
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers drive our nation’s innovation and competitiveness by generating new ideas, new companies and new industries. However, U.S. businesses frequently voice concerns over the supply and availability of STEM workers. Over the past 10 years, growth in STEM jobs was three times as fast as growth in non-STEM jobs. STEM workers are also less...