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Spotlight on Commerce: Sheree Cheung, Program Analyst, Office of Advocacy Center, International Trade Administration (ITA)


Sheree Cheung, Program Analyst, Office of Advocacy Center, International Trade Administration (ITA)

My name is Sheree Cheung, and I have had the pleasure of serving as the Program Analyst within the International Trade Administration’s (ITA’s), Advocacy Center for the past 11 years. The Advocacy Center works on behalf of U.S. businesses and workers to help level the playing field around the globe for businesses competing for international contracts against foreign firms. Our office also promotes the growth of exports of U.S. goods and services around the world.

I love what I do and am motivated each and every day to give my all-both in my professional and personal life. I have a background in business management and, as the Program Analyst, I manage the office’s administrative functions (i.e., budget, HR, procurements, travel, property, security) and I find pleasure in being able to oversee these portfolios. I started my career in government as a student aide at both the Library of Commerce and the Department of Defense. In 1996, I joined the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In 2006, I became part of the ITA family, where prior to the Advocacy Center, I worked in the Global Markets office. I chose federal service because it was where my family worked and served, and my high school offered the ‘Work-Study Program’ that helped get my foot in the door.

I grew up in Prince George’s County, Maryland and, not too long ago, moved to Charles County. I graduated from Parkdale Senior High School and completed several business courses at Prince George’s Community College. I have been a member of the First Baptist Church of Glenarden, Maryland for over 17 years and my daily goal is to ‘Do Better and Be Better.”  I am influenced by my mother and the many lessons she’s instilled in me. I try to live by her words every day. Her words never fell on deaf ears. She taught me that I must travel my own journey, fall on my own, and know how to get up, dust myself off and keep trying. As a member of the Grace Girl Gathering ministry, I try to carry these lessons instilled by my mother by providing support to other women, wives, and mothers.

Black History Month means to me that my voice and my actions matter.  So many before me worked very hard to ensure I have the opportunities they did not have. I no longer take that for granted. Today I am a proud civil servant. My pride was instilled in me along with the values to care about others, help where I can and want the best for everyone. My advice to today’s youth interested in a Federal government career is this: Life is what you make it. No job is too big or too small because everything and everyone matters. And, finally, never be afraid to step up and do your part.

The motto I try to live by came from my experiences as a parent and the way my own mother raised me: To live life one day at a time and try to fulfill God’s purpose for my life through my everyday actions at both home and at work.

Ed. note: This post is part of the Spotlight on Commerce series highlighting the contributions of Department of Commerce African Americans during Black History Month.