Department of Commerce Announces Twenty-Six States Achieved Record Export Levels in 2014

New executive actions to boost rural exports also released

Feb262015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, February 26, 2015

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker today announced new data that shows 26 states achieved records in goods exports in 2014, while eight additional states experienced growth in merchandise exports over 2013 levels. Total merchandise exports from all 50 states helped the U.S. achieve the fifth consecutive record-setting year of goods and services exports, which reached $2.35 trillion in 2014.

“Exports are critical to economic growth and job creation in communities across the country,” said Secretary Pritzker. “With 95 percent of the world’s consumers living outside the United States, opening more markets to ‘Made in America’ goods and services is fundamental to our nation’s competitiveness, job creation, and the economic security of our families.

“We know that 11.3 million American jobs are supported by exports. The Obama Administration has set an ambitious trade agenda that will help our businesses, workers, and innovators compete on a level playing field around the world, so they can expand and hire here at home. Now is the time for Congress to pass bipartisan trade promotion legislation, so we can enact new trade agreements with high standards that uphold our values and protect our national security.”

The 26 states that set new records for exports in 2014 include:

  • Texas ($289.0 billion);
  • California ($174.1 billion);
  • Washington ($90.6 billion);
  • Illinois ($68.2 billion);
  • Louisiana ($65.1 billion);
  • Ohio ($52.1 billion);
  • Georgia ($39.4 billion);
  • Indiana ($35.5 billion);
  • Tennessee ($33.0 billion);
  • North Carolina ($31.3 billion);
  • South Carolina ($29.7 billion);
  • Kentucky ($27.5 billion);
  • Wisconsin ($23.4 billion);
  • Minnesota ($21.4 billion);
  • Arizona ($21.1 billion);
  • Oregon ($20.9 billion);
  • Virginia ($19.2 billion);
  • Iowa ($15.1 billion);
  • Maryland ($12.2 billion);
  • Nebraska ($7.9 billion);
  • North Dakota ($5.3 billion);
  • New Hampshire ($4.4 billion);
  • New Mexico ($3.8 billion);
  • Rhode Island ($2.4 billion);
  • Wyoming ($1.8 billion); and
  • Hawaii ($1.5 billion).

In addition, the following states achieved growth in total merchandise exports in 2014: Alabama; Alaska; Maine; Massachusetts; Missouri; Montana; New Jersey; and South Dakota. All 50 states have experienced an increase in exports since 2009.

Additional facts about state exports in 2014. 

  • In 2014, the top five exporters were Texas, California, Washington, New York and Illinois.
  • Exports to free trade agreement partners increased in 33 states in 2014.
  • Nine states achieved double digit growth in exports in 2014.
    • Hawaii showed the fastest export growth in 2014, with sales of goods to overseas markets increasing by 143 percent.
    • Other states with double digit export growth were North Dakota, New Mexico, Oregon, Wyoming, Alaska, South Carolina, Washington, and Rhode Island.
  • Since 2009, exports from all 50 states have increased.
  • The five states with the largest export growth since 2009 in terms of dollars are Texas, California, Washington, Louisiana, and New York.
  • The 5 states with the fastest growth (since 2009) are New Mexico, Hawaii, North Dakota, Louisiana, and Wyoming.

New efforts to support rural manufacturing jobs and exporters

In addition to efforts to broker free trade agreements, today the President is announcing new executive actions to help rural small businesses access export-related information and assistance. As part of his “Made in Rural America” initiative launched in February 2014, the Administration has brought together federal resources to help rural businesses access markets at home and abroad. Building from feedback received at events across the country in 2014, the White House Rural Council has developed a number of new commitments to connect rural businesses with services to expand exports and to address export-related challenges identified by rural businesses.

Examples of initiatives being announced today to support rural exports include:

  • A series of reverse trade missions and outreach events for rural businesses to meet foreign buyers, partners, and trade experts and facilitate access to additional foreign markets;
  • An effort to double the number of rural businesses attending international trade shows and missions;
  • A new National Rural Export Innovation Team to help more rural businesses access export-related assistance, information and events;
  • A new partnership with community banks to help increase access to capital for rural exporters;
  • A new partnership with the United States Postal Service to host “Grow Your Business” Day events throughout rural America;
  • A new financial index for rural infrastructure projects that will encourage additional investments in infrastructure that is vital to manufacturing and exports;
  • A new effort to promote an entrepreneurial ecosystem mentorship program for rural communities;
  • Launching an i6 Rural Challenge, which will focus on providing funding to rural communities to build capacity for commercializing technology through agency collaboration and providing funding to Challenge winners.

Strengthening partnerships with states and rural communities in support of exporters and investment attraction efforts is a key objective for the second phase of President Obama’s National Export Initiative – NEI/NEXT, which Secretary Pritzker launched in May 2014. Through NEI/NEXT, 20 federal agencies are advancing program and policy improvements to provide exporters more tailored assistance and information; streamline export reporting requirements; expand access to export financing; ensure market access and a level playing field; and collaborate with state and local organizations.

To find more information about each state's exports, please visit www.Trade.gov/FTA

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Last updated: 2015-03-03 10:25

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