Commerce.gov is getting a facelift soon. See the new design.

Remarks at Press Conference Kicking Off Trade Mission to China and Indonesia

Printer-friendly version

AS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY

Sunday, May 16, 2010

CONTACT OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

202-482-4883

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke
Remarks at Press Conference Kicking Off Trade Mission to China and Indonesia in Hong Kong

Press release

Thank you for all for joining me today.

It is wonderful to be in Hong Kong again.  I’ve been here many times and am always impressed by the hospitality and graciousness of the people in this city. This time is no different.  I want to begin by thanking all of the Hong Kong government and business leaders who have helped make this trip possible.

I am here on the heels of the announcement of President Obama’s National Export Initiative – which aims to double American exports by 2015 – on the administration’s first cabinet-level trade mission.

As you can see, I have arrived with quite an entourage.

Joining me on this trip are senior executives from 24 American companies that represent a cross-section of the best that America has to offer in clean energy, energy efficiency, and electricity energy storage, transmission and distribution.

In the days ahead, I’ll be eager to help these companies find new business partners in Hong Kong and mainland China, as they seek to win contracts for projects like building wind turbines and designing more energy-efficient buildings.

Innovative companies like these – bringing emerging technologies to a dynamic new market – are going to play a big role in meeting the ambitious goals President Obama laid out in his export initiative.

The companies on this trade mission can help create economic opportunity and good jobs back in America, while helping Hong Kong and China grow their own economies and meet energy demand in a way that won’t put the planet and our entire way of life at risk.

This trade mission is truly a win-win for American companies and their workers and for the people of Hong Kong and China. 

But trips like this one also have much broader implications – because how well the United States and China can work and invest together in this emerging industry will very likely determine whether the entire world can deal with its energy and environmental challenges.

With global energy demand slated to double by 2050, we’re going to have to mobilize every innovative company and every bright mind we can behind discovering cleaner, greener energy solutions.

If we meet this challenge – and I believe we can – we can unlock one of the greatest economic opportunities of the 21st century, and put millions of people to work in high-skill, high-wage jobs.

The U.S. and China – as the world's two biggest emitters of carbon – have a moral responsibility to lead the world in this area.

But as two of the world’s most productive and innovative economies, the United States and China also have the resources and capacity to deliver. 

And I’m looking forward to helping these American companies showcase what they've got to offer, while exploring other areas of clean energy cooperation with our partners in the Hong Kong and Chinese governments.

Thank you all again for coming, and I'll be happy to answer a few questions.