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Blog Category: Apportionment

2010 Census and Apportionment

Next Tuesday, the nation will see the very first results from the 2010 Census when the U.S. Census Bureau releases the total population counts for the nation and each state. These counts will show us how our population has grown and shifted over the last decade. As mandated by the U.S. Constitution, the Census counts every resident in the United States every 10 years to determine the number of seats each state receives in the U.S. House of Representatives – known as apportionment. The number of seats in the House has grown with the size of the country. Congress sets the number by law, which was most recently increased to 435 in 1913. Back in 1787, the Constitution set the number of representatives at 65 until the first Census of 1790, when it was increased to 105 members. But how does apportionment actually work? The U.S. Census Bureau helps explain how the apportionment formula is used to ensure equal representation for all, just like the Founding Fathers planned in its new apportionment video.

U.S. Census Bureau to Provide Insight into Nation's Population with Upcoming Data Releases

Image of Robert Groves on podiumCommerce's U.S. Census Bureau today hosted a press briefing at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. to provide an update on census operations, detailing the steps required to both process and evaluate the 2010 Census data collected from over 130 million U.S. households. Census Bureau Director Robert Groves explained that the 2010 Census numbers are just one part of a series of data releases coming out in the months ahead that provide information about our nation’s population.  

On December 6, the Census Bureau will release a set of national population estimates called Demographic Analysis that are based on historical data of births, deaths and estimates of in- and out-migration. Later in December, the Census Bureau will release the first-ever set of five-year American Community Survey (ACS) data. These detailed data are essential to the understanding of our nation and our ability to make informed decisions about the future of our communities.

By the end of December, the Census Bureau will release the first 2010 Census data: the total population for the nation and states, and the apportionment counts allocating congressional seats by state. For more information, visit http://2010.census.gov/2010census/