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Secretary Bryson Advocates Build It Here, Sell It Everywhere at State Department Global Business Conference

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Bryson flanked by flags at the State Department

Earlier today, Secretary Bryson spoke to the first-ever State Department Global Business Conference during an afternoon plenary session entitled, “What the Government Can Do for Business.” He discussed his top priorities as Commerce Secretary: supporting advanced manufacturing, increasing U.S. exports, and attracting more investment to the U.S. Bryson highlighted efforts at making the Commerce Department an effective partner and resource for American businesses.

Secretary Bryson focused on the Administration's jobs effort, saying "In October of last year, I was confirmed as Secretary. Around that same time, Secretary Clinton sent a cable to her staff in U.S. embassies.  It said that strengthening our economic leadership abroad and driving growth here at home – “economic statecraft” – is now a key part of what the State Department does. I was pleased to hear this because economic statecraft aligns perfectly with the top priorities I have for the Commerce Department: supporting advanced manufacturing, increasing U.S. exports, and attracting more investment to the U.S. – all to create jobs."

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton amplified that message earlier at the luncheon session, saying "I have made 'Jobs Diplomacy' a priority mission at the State Department, with a clear goal: Just as our companies are ready to out-work, out-innovate, and out-compete their rivals, so we intend to be the most effective diplomatic champions for prosperity and growth."

The Conference brought together senior officials from U.S. business support organizations from over 100 countries; U.S. private sector executives focused on international business; and senior U.S. government leaders from the White House, the Departments of State, Commerce, Treasury and Energy, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.

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