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Commerce Department's Census Bureau Announces Management and Structural Reforms that will Improve Efficiency and Cut Costs

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Map Depicting Current Census Bureau Regional Office Structure

Today, the Commerce Department’s U.S. Census Bureau announced the first realignment of its national field office structure in 50 years and management reforms that will improve efficiency, reduce costs and enhance data quality. The changes will take place gradually over the next 18 months and reduce the number of regional offices from 12 to six, saving an estimated $15 million to $18 million annually beginning in 2014.

Increasing efficiency, cutting waste and reforming Washington has been a priority for the Obama Administration since day one, and this consolidation supports the administration’s ongoing effort to make government more efficient, effective and accountable to the American people. It also builds on the work of Census Bureau Director Robert Groves and his management team in bringing in the 2010 Census on time and 25 percent under budget, saving nearly $1.9 billion.

For more information, please see today's announcement on the White House Web site.

Earlier this month, President Obama and Vice President Biden launched the Campaign to Cut Waste with the goal of eliminating misspent tax dollars in every agency and department across the federal government. Whether the budget is in surplus or deficit, every dollar must be spent as efficiently as possible, but in a time when so many Americans have had to cut back, our mission takes on added urgency.

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Efficiency & Energy

When will efficiency be tied to rising energy needs, particularly given increasing energy needs overall and the risk of a rising tax burden for administration? I recall a similar effort back in the 1980's which did not gain traction back then, though I expect things have changed somewhat given we are closer to resource exhaustion and the recent recession has brought cost issues and government waste under close scrutiny. http://www.cagw.org/