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Secretary Locke to Visit the Consumer Electronics Show

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Photo Credit: Consumer Electronics Show

Secretary Gary Locke will visit the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas Thursday where he will discuss the Obama administration’s efforts to foster innovation and the President’s National Export Initiative (NEI), which seeks to double U.S. exports by 2015, supporting several million American jobs.

The Consumer Electronics Show is taking part in Commerce’s International Buyer Program – a key component in reaching President Obama’s exports goal. Jointly created by the Commerce Department and industry groups, the International Buyer Program (IBP) matches international buyers with U.S. companies that want to export.  In Las Vegas, the IBP has recruited to the show's 34 delegations, consisting of 700 delegates, from key markets such as China, Brazil, Vietnam, and Indonesia – an increase of over 30 percent from the 2010 show.

Here’s how it will work: Foreign trade specialists work with both the Consumer Electronics Association and Department of Commerce domestic trade specialists to identify U.S. companies exhibiting at the show whose technology is attractive to foreign buyers.  These specialists then set up meetings at the show between the buyers and American sellers.  Additionally, U.S. companies will be able to meet with the foreign trade specialists to get information about doing business in markets abroad.
In 2010, Commerce’s International Buyer Program recruited more than 12,000 international attendees from more than 100 countries to 35 U.S. trade shows for business-to-business matchmaking. According to the most recent data, the IBP directly led to nearly $800 million worth of new business for U.S. companies, supporting more than 4,000 American jobs.  

The CES is an annual event hosted by the Consumer Electronics Association, the preeminent trade association that represents more than 2,000 businesses to promote growth in the consumer technology industry.  This year’s CES will have more than 2,500 small- and medium-sized businesses showcasing their products and services, as well as presentations by key industry leaders, such as Microsoft, Ford and Verizon.

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We need a national incubation programs for tech startups

Having received 3 SBIR/STTR grants and incorporated, our startup is faced with bewildering requirement on reporting, Cal EDD, and IRS 941 submissions. Startups are being dragged down by antiquated labor laws in the area of contractors vs. employees. We like to see exceptions made for startups without revenue.

I applaud the expanded NIST R&D budget, but like to see more resources given to NWS, NOAA to support the Solar and Wind industry in global, web-based sensing and assessment data.

America is lagging in innovation, education, and high-speed internet access. Grass root, or individual citizen inventors need assistance to create value and commercialize innovations. I like
to suggest the USPTO or a separate organization be setup around the country to provide incubation resources to nurture and facilitate citizens' effort in creating product and services, and their commercialization.

many people obey the rule

many people obey the rule

Export and Import assistance

Just one of the obstacles that most American companies face is their failure to understand that their documentation, just because "We have always done it this way" does not work in Asia. What matters is the respective country's requirements for documentation. At times, even when I sent specific templates to follow for invoicing, packing list and cat numbers, the templates were ignored and I had to rewrite the documents, send back by fed-x to be re sent to me as amendments to the originals. Or, the old stand by, bribe Customs. I hope the N.E.I. works. I would love to help. Americans can and still do manufacture innovative and useful products. They just have not figured out how to take advantage of the HUGE demand for them overseas and how to take care of their new prospective clients.
Thanks